Category Archives: Nourishing sauces

Decadent Chocolate Cake (flourless, resembling the best brownies of your life).

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I wish I could remember where I found the original idea for this cake. I would like to credit them as it is absolutely brilliant. I stared at the ingredients wondering how a cake without flour would hold together. I was sceptical, but gave it a try and was amazed by the results. Without flour you get pure, delicious chocolaty-ness. I now make this cake for all birthdays requiring chocolate cake. I top it with the birthday persons favourite fruit and whipped cream and/or icing. It’s incredibly rich and special.
*I will post a picture once I make the cake again.*
I will give a few ingredient options, highlighting in bold the ones I used.

Rich, dark and decadent chocolate cake

-12 oz. of chocolate, melted*(chocolate chips, bakers chocolate or raw cacao paste)
-1 cup fat, melted (butter, coconut oil, lard, ghee)
-1 1/2 cups of sugar (coconut sugar, sucanat, rapadura)
-1/2 tsp salt
-4 tsp vanilla (raw vanilla powder, vanilla extract or bean)
-6 large eggs (4 of Chicken Man’s egg yolks)
-1/2 to 1 cup cocoa (raw cacao powder, cocoa powder)

Blend all ingredients together until smooooooth.

Pour into greased pan lined with parchment paper. I use a large round clay pan, but an 8×8 or a bit larger would work too.

Bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes, until
Middle is no longer jiggly and firm
On top.
Cool completely before cutting.

This can feed up to 20 people especially when cut into small pieces and generously topped with fruit and whipped cream.

Thick Fruit Sauce

2 cups frozen fruit, thawed.
1/2 cup sweetener, like honey.
4 tbsp thickener like arrowroot or potato starch.

Mix all ingredients together while cold. Bring to boil and keep on until mixture turns clear (cooking the starch out).
Cool.
Eat with a spoon repeatedly to test it. 🙂

Weedstock and Food Freedom: Discovered!

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I pleased myself greatly last night when I came up with Weedstock and when I fully developed my thoughts and feelings on food freedom with children. I was watching Michael, my partner, meticulously pull and nibble on “weeds” in the front yard. We eat our weeds, so far they’ve all been edible. I noticed that he was pulling more weeds than he could consume and so I asked him for them to throw into my soup stock. The undesirable plants that grow voluntarily and that we rip, hoe and poison: they are loaded with valuable nutrients, more so than the lettuce and cabbages we so laboriously grow. When picked young, they are also tender and not as bitter. Or simply throw them into your stock. I have a few things that I do for a super rich and delicious stock.

How to make Weedstock:

1. Sauté your vegetables (onions, carrots and any other vegetable scraps) on low in a fat with a high smoking point. I use lard, chicken fat or you could use butter or olive oil. I cook them slowly to perfect caramelization. I like to do this over a morning as it poses no risk of burning when it’s on low.
2. Add water to cover: bones, meats, herbs, a few spoons of vinegar (or over fermented kombucha, to draw out minerals), egg shells and WEEDS! Please make sure you’ve identified a plant 100% before using.
3. Simmer (do not boil) for 2 days or more.
4. Strain and use in dishes, soups and sauces. I strain it as we need it.

My kids are so use to these foods now that they ask for it. I wasn’t making broth due to not wanting to heat up the house and my oldest asked why I wasn’t making broth. I was pleasantly shocked as he has been the child to complain the most about the healthy foods I’ve been cooking. Now he has a taste for it. He told me that he comes and grabs a cup of broth out of the pot when he’s hungry. I’m so happy!
There seems to have been a major shift in my kids lately. I’ve been letting go of food issues and beliefs and focusing on the foods that call me, and them. There was a point when candy and processed treats distressed me and I wanted to rip it from their hands and run with it into the wild where I could burn it and dump dish soap all over its KRAFT insides. Well, as fun as that was, I’m letting it go. I’m accepting it as the reality that is now. Factories make food like products and sometimes my children want it and they want it too much. Well, the truth is that I want it too much sometimes as well. It’s not just children. It’s a challenge; a gastrointestinal challenge mostly. I’m working on conquering my own by cooking and eating what I am peacefully drawn to and I see that it is radiating down to the children. They are joining into my passion for wild and local, real foods. They love to be able to identify wild foods they can eat as well as take part in animal and vegetable harvests. More importantly than what they eat, is how they eat. I want them
To feel free to eat without stress, judgement, shame or guilt.
With this freedom, we are finding the foods that they love.
With the inner candy/junk struggle within me, I decided to focus on the good and ignore the sneaky candy. I knew it had gotten bad when they felt they had to sneak it. That’s not true freedom. My restricting had led to them wanting it more and sneaking it. But oh well right? Live, love and learn. So…
I was also starting to see how my projecting of fears and beliefs about certain foods could and would cause food issues in the kids. But I had an idea…
So I started making ice cream for them every night. Sometimes we had leftovers for breakfast or an afternoon snack. They love it. I make it with LOTS of egg yolks, raw/local honey, fresh fruits, mineral rich maple syrup, fresh garden herbs like mint and basil, probiotic loaded kefir and occasionally raw cream and milk.
They are seeming more satisfied these days and are not asking for foods which I am not already buying. Interesting. I buy a variety and I buy what they like. They are inventing their own satisfying recipes out of our good, wholesome ingredients. Fascinating! Sometimes I’m buying marshmallows, as the homemade ones just melt into the hot campfire coals. yes, sometimes I am buying marshmallows and my friends and family become wide-eyed as I am usually known as crazy, food person. Well, crazy just got kooky.
Something has switched, and I think it is me. It’s always me.
It turns out that children are people and they do want to be healthy and happy. Sometimes they fail, but so do I. It’s all part of the journey.

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“Lettuce-head”, Michael. He is twelve and sometimes takes on the character of a rabbit when he eats his lettuce plain and plentiful.

A basic sauce of butter and eggs

A basic, decadent and nourishing SAUCE or cheese sauce. ( Flourless and milk-free.) This is super thick and creamy.

Begin to melt,
1 CUP OF BUTTER, you want it hot ( I used organic, grass-fed)
5 EGGS, plus
2 YOLKS in a separate saucepan (with the heat off) whisked until thickened and buttery yellow.
Whisk in:
PINCH OF SALT
1 TBSP VINEGAR (I used apple cider)
1 TBSP COLD BUTTER

Put on low heat and whisk some more!
I lift pot up and down, off of heat, now and then to prevent cooking eggs too quickly.
As soon as you can see bottom of pot
Like this:

!

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when you whisk,
Remove from heat.
Stir in
1 TBSP cold butter whisked until melted in.
Begin to dribble in melted, hot butter (the one cup at the beginning) and whisk oh so much more! You can add it more quickly after about half a cup
Of the butter.
And voila! You have a basic Flourless, milkless sauce! And it’s sooo good for you. A perfect addition to steamed veggies. If it’s too thick you can add a little milk or water.

CHEESE SAUCE: now I am going to add a cup of old, organic, white cheddar. Put on low heat until cheese is melted. Try with cayenne or hot pepper for those that like spicy stuff!
Possibilities are endless!
It’s also excellent as a nacho dip.

Tonight I am going to dribble this cheese sauce over cooked ground meat with sauteed onions and broccoli. A major hit at our house!

Keeps well in fridge.

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