Category Archives: nourishing foods that kids love

How to cut up your own organic free ranged dead chicken.

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I’ve decided that I would like to do more videos and less writing.
Sure I would I want to share my random opinions but I’ve realized that I have some mad skills that I could be teaching.
I’m spending my life collecting skills that improve quality of life.
Many of them are very easy and anyone can do it. And Many of them also do not involve pig heads or chicken feet. I will warn you when those ones come up but I would like to invite you to set an intention for yourself to be cool with uncommon animal parts because they are so commonly thrown away.

So, here it is!

My first skill share, just for you, my beloved followers.
It’s only three and a half minutes long and will teach you how to cut up your own free range organic chicken.
Doing this makes ethical meat so affordable. And we all love meat that wasn’t raised in its own poop without a beak of its own to peck bugs with.
I’ll figure out how to put the video right on the page, but until then you’ll have to click the link…

How to cut up your own free ranged organic dead chicken.

Lying to my children about food.

One day I decided to stop lying to my children about what they were eating. I would always try to sneak in a little hemp hearts or cod liver oil or whatever my newest fad food was at the time. I started to wonder if this practice may have been hurting them more than helping. I thought about this deeply and realized that it didn’t feel honest and authentic to me. By lying about their food I was sending them the message that I didn’t trust them to want to nourish their bodies. I was also creating a relationship of distrust in such an intimate way. Food is something that we put inside our bodies. How could I be all gung-ho for food labelling yet not allow my children to know what they were eating?!?!? I’m amazed by my own level of narrow minded thinking but we grow and learn better, right?
Another thing I thought about was how powerful it is to associate what we eat and how we feel. I wasn’t allowing my children that opportunity to make the food/body connection because I assumed that I knew best. I assumed they wouldn’t want to do the best thing for themselves. That’s crazy talk (or thought). All humans want the best.
So, I swallowed my fear and clenched my butt a little, when I said ” there’s hearts and livers in that chili.” and “Yes, I added some raw egg to that”.
When I first started being honest they would often decline to eat because I had trained them that health foods were to be hidden and mistrusted. Things are much different now.
My oldest son was sure that he HATED kombucha because I didn’t tell him that I added into jellos and soups and other things, but once I started telling him, then he knew he liked kombucha and was more willing to try stuff. Everything, he was more open to trying everything!
We are actually coming to a place where the previously hidden ingredients are now prized treasures. My daughter often asks if something is good for her as she knows the value of it. My son looks up recipes for new healthy things to try. He can be heard saying such things into google search as “heallllthy marshhhhhhmalllllows.”. I believe that this honesty has improved our relationships (and our lives) in so many ways. I feel like I can openly talk about what I am fermenting and making with it and they are interested and happy to try it, most of the time. They are still human though and sometimes I wonder when I will have gone too far. The boys did try the authentic headcheese I made last week even after seeing the “ingredients”. 😀

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Beautiful headcheese. I was told by a food historian, author, professor guy (Ken Albala) that I nailed it. It’s so exciting to take something that would otherwise be garbage and make food.

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Happy Kombucha SCOBY. We don’t eat these. Yet.

Do you sneak foods into your kids?

Decadent Chocolate Cake (flourless, resembling the best brownies of your life).

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I wish I could remember where I found the original idea for this cake. I would like to credit them as it is absolutely brilliant. I stared at the ingredients wondering how a cake without flour would hold together. I was sceptical, but gave it a try and was amazed by the results. Without flour you get pure, delicious chocolaty-ness. I now make this cake for all birthdays requiring chocolate cake. I top it with the birthday persons favourite fruit and whipped cream and/or icing. It’s incredibly rich and special.
*I will post a picture once I make the cake again.*
I will give a few ingredient options, highlighting in bold the ones I used.

Rich, dark and decadent chocolate cake

-12 oz. of chocolate, melted*(chocolate chips, bakers chocolate or raw cacao paste)
-1 cup fat, melted (butter, coconut oil, lard, ghee)
-1 1/2 cups of sugar (coconut sugar, sucanat, rapadura)
-1/2 tsp salt
-4 tsp vanilla (raw vanilla powder, vanilla extract or bean)
-6 large eggs (4 of Chicken Man’s egg yolks)
-1/2 to 1 cup cocoa (raw cacao powder, cocoa powder)

Blend all ingredients together until smooooooth.

Pour into greased pan lined with parchment paper. I use a large round clay pan, but an 8×8 or a bit larger would work too.

Bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes, until
Middle is no longer jiggly and firm
On top.
Cool completely before cutting.

This can feed up to 20 people especially when cut into small pieces and generously topped with fruit and whipped cream.

Thick Fruit Sauce

2 cups frozen fruit, thawed.
1/2 cup sweetener, like honey.
4 tbsp thickener like arrowroot or potato starch.

Mix all ingredients together while cold. Bring to boil and keep on until mixture turns clear (cooking the starch out).
Cool.
Eat with a spoon repeatedly to test it. 🙂

Chocolate Salted Fudge Dreams. (Flourless, Gluten Free)

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Oven 350

In a bowl:

1/2 cup of egg whites (3 large eggs)
1 cup cocoa
1 tsp vanilla
3 TBSP arrowroot (or tapioca, potato starch)
2 1/4 cup sugar (I used coconut sugar)

Put on a cookie sheet. They will expand quite a bit.
Sprinkle with coarse sea salt.
Bake 8-10 minutes.

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Perfect Gluten-Free Waffles, light and crispy.

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I get very excited when I discover a new recipe that is super satisfying and full of real ingredients like eggs and butter. It’s been years of eating satisfactory waffles until this week!

WAFFLES:

This recipe *could* be all thrown together in a bowl and blended instead of doing separate bowls like in the recipe:

Melt on low:
1/2 cup butter or coconut oil

Whisked together to remove clumps:
1 1/4 cup rice or sorghum flour (or half and half)
1/2 cup potato starch
1 tbsp potato flour
2 tsp baking powder
2 tbsp sweetener (coconut sugar, rapadura, honey or maple syrup)
1/2 tsp sea salt

In another bowl:
3/4 cup of milk or other liquid
2 eggs
2 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp vanilla (optional)

Combine all ingredients.
Let the batter stand and it will be thick and this is good!
Cook until golden and perfect.
These waffles freeze perfectly.
If you freeze on a cookie sheet and then bag, it makes it convenient to grab one or two for a quick snack or meal.

How to easily make delicious beet kvass.

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This is a picture of the beet kvass after I’ve drank most of it. Beet kvass is a wonderful and richly nourishing drink that’s loaded with probiotics and healing properties. It supports immune function and cleanses the blood. I find that it gives me energy and an overall feeling of goodness. It’s my favourite ferment right now.
*update* I am finding that when I do not consume the beet kvass regularly I get dehydrated with headaches. I try to start all my mornings off with beet kvass. Here’s something else that’s interesting… If beet kvass makes your pee (not poo) red, then you have low stomach acid. I figured this out after I went on a research hunt to figure out why the beets had suddenly stopped creating red urine even though I was drinking more than ever. And when I quit drinking it for a while, the beets make my pee red again (low stomach acid) until I’ve been drinking it for about a week consistently every morning.

*i highly recommend making this in a FIDO (clamp down jar). The FIDO (made in Italy) brand does seem to be the best or other brands like LeParfait (made in France). Anything really not “made in China” should be good. When you make it in a FIDO, you don’t have to worry about yeasts and moulds as the environment becomes anaerobic (without oxygen) and yeasts and moulds need oxygen to survive.*

HOW TO MAKE BEET KVASS:

PER LITRE: (I make 4 litres at a time in a large FIDO jar):

-2-3 large beets, cut up with skins on. Notes: (do not grate your beets or they will ferment too fast and turn alcoholic). Your beet to brine ratio should be about half and half to get a good, thick kvass.
To make beets sweeter for your kvass, cut tops off and leave a week to let the sugars concentrate.

-1 TBSP salt (20 grams precisely)- you can use a bit less salt if you don’t like salty tastes.

-1 litre of unchlorinated water (I use the beet water from cooked beets, cooled)

Enchanting Additions:
-cut up pieces of ginger
-cayenne
-peppercorns
-carrot
-dill
-some people swear adding by onions and cabbage for people that don’t like beets.

1. Put all ingredients in a jar, the clamp down ones work best. Leave a good amount of head space, about 1-2 inches. Don’t leave too much or the environment may not become anaerobic.
2. Let ferment 5-9 days on the counter, or longer. It’s fine for long periods of time as you don’t open it.
3. Strain the liquid out once its thick and delicious. Refrigerate liquid. You can use your beets now to make a second batch by adding more brine. I usually add a few more beets.

OR The leftover beets can eaten as pickled beets or in a salad. To make them they should be placed in another brine to ferment them further. 1 tbsp salt to 1 litre water. Add some dill?

Fudgy Flourless cookies, as promised…

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I promised everyone a recipe taken from this Flourless chocolate fudge cookie recipe that did not use confectioners sugar.
I’ve done about six text batches and they’ve all turned out very tasty! The stickiness and their ability to hold together was very different depending on whether I used the whole egg, a clay baking sheet, arrowroot added and the time baked. Some turned out really sticky and ended up as one, big delicious cookie once put in a container together. When baked a little longer, they turned out like the cookie
In the picture.
They are also super simple to make!
So basically I just substituted the confectioners sugar for coconut sugar and 3 tbsp of arrowroot. One batch I use xanthan gum but I really don’t think it is necessary. It was easy to play with, adding mint or dried cherries, cranberries. Maybe you will play with the recipe too and let me know?

Fudgy Flourless Chocolate Cookies:

Oven at 350 degrees

Mix together:

3 egg whites (or 2 whites and 1 whole egg for thicker cookies)
2 1/4 cups coconut sugar (rapadura or sucanat would be great too)
3 TBSP arrowroot
1 cup cocoa (I use the high fat red cocoa)
1/4 tsp sea salt
2 tBSP vanilla
For thicker cookies add 1 tbsp. potato flour and 1 tbsp. potato starch

Drop onto greased parchment paper (never wax!).
These cookies REALLY spread out. So I tried to do 1 inch across blobs with lots of space in between.
Bake at 350 for 10 minutes.
They worked best with waiting until they COMPLETELY cooled. Very hard to do, very hard to do. 🙂

Options, ADD:
-1 tsp espresso powder
-a drop or two of peppermint oil
-dried cherries or other fruit (add after its been dropped onto cookie sheet)
-what can you think of?

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Chaz and Emmett and Brother-Love.